12 ways to say “You’re welcome”

12 ways to say “You’re welcome”

by Andrea Byaruhanga

Updated August 12, 2022

If you’re currently learning English, you’ve probably realized that there are lots of ways to say the same thing. For example, have you ever thanked an English speaker for doing something nice or helpful? You might have noticed that they don’t always respond with “You’re welcome.” 

While that may be the traditional answer when someone says “Thank you,” it’s definitely not the only one. Depending on the situation and the person you’re talking to, another response might work just as well—or even better.  

Below, we’ll discuss some different ways to say “You’re welcome” and give you examples of when and how to use them. 

Oh, BTW: It’s always “You’re welcome,” and never “Your welcome,” despite what you might see written on social media!

  1. No problem/Not a problem 
  2. Anytime 
  3. Don’t worry about it/No worries 
  4. It was nothing
  5. Don’t mention it
  6. Of course
  7. You bet
  8. Pleased to be of assistance 
  9. The pleasure is all mine
  10. I’m sure you’d do the same for me
  11. It was the least I could do
  12. Thank you

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The first seven responses on our list are all appropriate in an informal context, such as thanking a friend, co-worker or barista at a local coffee shop.

1. No problem/Not a problem

This super-casual alternative to “You’re welcome” conveys that your helpful actions weren’t an inconvenience at all. If you want to get really informal, you can even throw in a “No prob!”

How to use it

Speaker 1: “Thanks for driving me home today. I really appreciate it.”

Speaker 2: “No prob! It was on my way.”   

2. Anytime

Want someone to feel comfortable asking you for more favors in the future? Then respond with “Anytime”—meaning you’ll help them whenever they need it.

How to use it

Speaker 1: “Thanks again for watching my kids while I was at my appointment.”

Speaker 2: “Anytime! I know it’s hard to find childcare.”

3. Don’t worry about it/No worries!

This response is very similar to “No problem.” It expresses that the person thanking you hasn’t caused you any trouble and shouldn’t give it another thought.

How to use it

Speaker 1: “Thank you for lending us your tent for camping last weekend.”

Speaker 2: “No worries! We weren’t using it.”

4. It was nothing

Telling someone, “It was nothing” is another casual way to express that your actions were insignificant and not a big deal.

How to use it

Speaker 1: “You really helped me out by bringing the appetizers to the party—thanks so much!”

Speaker 2: “It was nothing!”

5. Don’t mention it

This response expresses the idea that your actions were so insignificant that you don’t even need to be thanked. In other words, whatever good deed you did doesn’t need to be mentioned at all.

How to use it

Speaker 1: “Thanks for the cookies! Oatmeal raisin is my favorite.” 

Speaker 2: “Don’t mention it.”

6. Of course

Typically, you’d say “Of course” in response to a yes/no question, but it’s used a little differently here. What this basically means is “Of course you’re welcome to my help.”

How to use it

Speaker 1: “I’m so grateful for the wonderful reference letter you wrote for my college application.” 

Speaker 2: “Of course! I meant every word.” 

7. You bet

The expression “You bet” is sometimes used as a positive response to a request; it’s similar to saying “Sure.” But you can also say it in response to a thank you; it’s kind of similar to saying “No problem.” 

How to use it

Speaker 1: “Thanks for sending me those great photos of the wedding; I can’t believe I didn’t take any.”

Speaker 2: “You bet!” 

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Now that you know what to say instead of “You’re welcome” in an informal setting, here are some different ways to say it in more formal situations, such as in an important business meeting with clients you’ve just met or in a professional email

8. Pleased to be of assistance

This expression is quite a formal way to say “You’re welcome,” but it really just means “Happy to help.” Make sure you’re not using this in everyday situations (e.g., if someone thanks you for holding the door open for them). You might get some funny looks.

How to use it

Speaker 1: “Thank you for your quick service delivering the sofa I purchased.”

Speaker 2: “Pleased to be of assistance.”

9. The pleasure is all mine

If you respond to someone with this expression, you’re more or less saying that it’s you who should be thanking them, as you got more enjoyment out of the situation than they did. 

How to use it

Speaker 1: “Thanks so much for agreeing to have dinner with me. I had a fantastic time!”

Speaker 2: “The pleasure is all mine.”

10. I’m sure you’d do the same for me

While this has a slightly more casual tone than some of the others on this list, it’s still on the formal side. You’re telling the person thanking you that you know they would also help you if you needed it.

How to use it

Speaker 1: “Thanks again for helping me move. It went so much faster with two people.”

Speaker 2: “I’m sure you’d do the same for me.”

11. It was the least I could do

The expression “It was the least I could do” means that your actions were very small; you did the bare minimum to help the person. This is often said out of politeness and isn’t always an accurate description of a person’s actions.

How to use it

Speaker 1: “I just received the grocery delivery you ordered for me. I really appreciate it.”

Speaker 2: “After everything you’ve been through, it was the least I could do.” 

12. Thank you

Wondering why a “Thank you” is on this list? Well, this expression is used when you want to respond to someone’s thanks with one of your own. For example, if you think you benefited from a situation just as much as—or more than—they did. Intonation is important here: Make sure to emphasize “you.”

How to use it

Speaker 1: “Thank you for taking the time to have a Zoom chat with me. I like to speak to all of our applicants face to face before making any hiring decisions.”

Speaker 2: “Thank you for the opportunity!” 


Mix it up with different ways to say “You’re welcome”

Feel thankful that we’ve given you some other ways to say “You’re welcome”? Don’t mention it! Next time someone thanks you for helping them out, try one of the responses above. You’ll sound like a native English speaker in no time. 

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Andrea is a Canadian freelance writer and editor specializing in English, e-learning, EdTech, and SaaS. She has a background as an ESL teacher in beautiful Vancouver, British Columbia. In her free time, Andrea loves hanging out with her husband and children, creating recipes in the kitchen, and reading fiction. She also loves camping and jumping into lakes whenever possible. Learn more about Andrea on LinkedIn or check out her website.

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