Language Marathon (First Impressions)

June 10th, 1:42 PM

10 days have passed, during which I attended 10 one-hour lessons. So far, I like it, especially the fact that for now I’ve managed not to miss lessons. For each class, learning materials are available, which you can (and probably should) review before the class. The materials are sufficiently informative and at the same time visual and comprehensible. Within each topic there are classes devoted to grammar, learning new words, reading, and speaking. If you complete all 50 classes of one course Lingoda promises to issue a language certificate recognized by different authorities. 

You should book your classes in advance, preferably 7 days before the start — otherwise there is a chance that there will not be a class available at your desired time. The lessons are held every hour, 24/7 and each group consists of up to 5 students. By choosing unpopular time slots, you can even get an individual lesson. All the teachers I’ve e-met as of now are competent and responsible. Every teacher speaks English, so when you don’t understand something, you can clear up the matter in English. All in all, I keep watching and learning.

Language Marathon. Part 2

June 18th, 2:06 PM

Today I will write in more detail about how the lessons are held, and about the teachers.

All the teachers are widely different. They even live in different parts of the world. Some live in Germany, others in Switzerland, there is even a teacher from Mexico. Some start their lessons by getting acquainted, ask you who you are, what your job is, and why you decided to learn German. Others immediately proceed with the topic of the lesson.

Usually, a class starts with the teacher opening a presentation with the learning material on the screen, then giving tasks to the students by turn: to read new words and sentences with them, to go through an exercise, or to have a conversation. If something is not clear, the conversation would switch to English. The learning materials also include homework that is not required to do, although I would advise you to do it. This helps consolidate the material covered. For that matter, the quality of learning depends primarily on the student; the teacher plays a supporting, directing and checking role here.

Our student, Mikhail.

What you need to succeed

June 25th, 8:47 PM

It may seem that success in mastering a foreign language is basically the will of a student. Consistency, perseverance, daily lessons, grammar, films, communication with native speakers, etc. will lead to success. All of this is true. But many things depend also on the teacher’s personality, knowledge, desire to teach, friendliness. ability to motivate, and even sense of humor.

A good teacher encourages you to be successful. What is good about Lingoda is that you have a new teacher every day. With his/her own methods, charisma, humor, but always with perfect pronunciation, knowledge and desire to help. By the way, I’ve already overcome one third of the language marathon. The most difficult is ahead: not to get tired of daily classes, and to keep my motivation. The teachers also play an important part in my success.

More about the Language School

June 12th, 4:05 PM

The language marathon is going on. Like in any marathon, as you approach the middle, you already can’t breathe comfortably, you get tired, in this case, mental fatigue. Finding an hour a day for a lesson and a half hour for preparation doesn’t seem too hard, does it? But it happens every day, and you start to notice that you almost have no time to spare. In such cases, several things can come to the rescue: first, some classes get cancelled, which gives you a 1-day pause; second, it is interesting to communicate with new people from all over the world; and third, I still want to finish the marathon. And I’m waiting for the second wind to kick in.

If it was easy, everybody would do it. “Only the hard ones make it to the garden” as the Germans say.

How One Mishap Can Potentially Ruin Your Marathon

June 23rd, 8:32 PM

A few days ago my marathon almost came to an end. What could have possibly gone wrong? Well, one of the main conditions of the marathon is not to miss classes, and not to be late. If you miss a lesson, you won’t get your money back. Tough, but the organizer has the right to lay down any conditions.

But sometimes, you need to book a class at 8 a.m. on a Sunday, or 10 p.m. during the week. 10 pm is not a very convenient time for me, because my daughter usually goes to bed at that time and she sleeps in the same room my computer is in, so I go to the kitchen and take my classes there on the tablet, with a keyboard. However, on that day everything went south. At 21:50 I turned my tablet on, but suddenly the famously timed Windows update kicked in. I was naive enough to think that in 10 minutes everything will be updated, and decided to wait. But five minutes later I realized that the process was obviously going to take much longer. I had only five minutes left before the start of the lesson.

What should I do? Luckily, there was my wife’s old, but still functioning laptop in the kitchen. I quickly turned it on, accessed Lingoda and logged in to my account. The lesson was just beginning. I pressed “start the lesson” and the installation of Zoom, where the classes take place, began. A few minutes later I managed to get to the virtual classroom.

The teacher was just getting acquainted with the students, so I had made it. But when the teacher ran an on-screen presentation, my laptop failed to show it — apparently, it was too old. I had to open the PDF file with the lessons presentation in browser, and constantly switch between the class and the browser. But all in all, the lesson wasn’t disrupted. And the Windows update on the tablet took more than an hour!

Want to know more?

You can find out more about the Lingoda Language Marathon on our website. Spaces are limited, so be quick!

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