5 German stereotypes: Are they true?

5 German stereotypes: Are they true?

by Anne Walther

Updated June 10, 2022

When most people think of Germans, common stereotypes come to mind: beer, sausages, Lederhosen and punctuality, to name a few. Of course, most of these stereotypes turn out to be completely untrue once you have been to Germany. 

For example, Germans often joke about the tardiness of the German trains and how the meat consumption in the country has been going down for years, with more than 10% of Germans now being vegetarian. However, there are some typical German things that might just be true enough to not be stereotypes. Let’s have a look at some German stereotypes you had no idea were a thing – and whether there’s truth to them.

  1. Germans love garden gnomes
  2. Germans wear socks in sandals
  3. Germans love literature
  4. Germans go nude a lot
  5. Germans love high-tech

Learn languages at your pace


1. Germans love garden gnomes

If you are walking around German gardens, you may come across several decorations – particularly garden gnomes or garden dwarfs (Gartenzwerge). Although most Germans consider them to be kitsch, ceramic garden gnomes indeed had their origins in Germany. As early as the 1700s, people had put wooden figures of dwarfs in their gardens out of superstition. In the 19th century, a company in Dresden had started producing Gartenzwerge, and the trend quickly spread across the country all the way to France. Today, there are more than 25 million garden gnomes in Germany.

2. Germans wear socks with sandals

Wearing socks with sandals is more than a controversial fashion choice. Especially in tourist regions, Germans are known for combining white or gray socks with hiking sandals. However, ancient Romans already wore the combination more than 2000 years ago. In modern times though, the phenomenon is mostly associated with Geek culture. With video gaming being among the most popular things Germans do, there might indeed be statistically more Germans identifying with the style.

3. Germans love literature

German literature has a rich history and you may find Germans referring to their country as the Nation der Dichter und Denker (nation of poets and intellectuals). Names like Goethe and Schiller are well-known around the world and literature movements like romanticism are rooted in Germany, as well. 

4. Germans go nude a lot

When you are spending time at the beach or at a public pool in Germany, you may be surprised to see people walking around topless or even nude. This phenomenon is known in Germany as Freikörperkultur or free body culture. Indeed, the German attitudes and values towards nudity are quite liberal and it can even be a requirement in saunas. However, most pools will require you to wear at least swimming pants and dress codes are highly respected in Germany.

5. Germans love high-tech

Germany may be known for being a highly developed country with many booming industries and huge progress in technology. In reality though, many Germans are rather conservative when it comes to new devices. Even today, far from everyone in the country owns a smartphone and particularly rural areas are known for poor internet connectivity. In addition, Germans value their privacy a lot, which is why Germany is still a blank spot in Google Street View.


Stereotypical German?

No matter where in the world, there are always typical ideas about the local culture – and Germany is no exception. While some stereotypes about Germans have been well-known to you, these ones may have been not on top of your head. In addition, there are even prejudices among different cultures and regions in Germany. For example, Northern Germans are said to be stubborn and Munich residents are stuffy – but of course, most stereotypes are far from the truth. 

Learn languages at your pace


Anne is a German freelance writer and communication consultant. In addition to her job, she is founder and coach of the Dutch non-for-profit organization CLUB Coaching. Due to her work, she resides in both Germany and the Netherlands. Whenever her time is not occupied with communication in all its forms, she spends time with her six pets, gardening or being creative with fashion and design. You can follow her on LinkedIn.

Related articles